Webcast Details

Webcast Information

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Stephanie Lau

Disclosure at Work
Stephanie Lau

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Employers and employees both benefit from disclosure in the workplace.  This webinar will offer businesses a basic understanding of disclosure, its benefits, and suggestions on how a business can encourage disclosure in the workplace.  You will also hear a real-life employer and coworkers of an ACE-IT in College student employee share their experiences with disclosure. 

This webcast is co-funded with the Center on Transition Innovations (CTI) at Virginia Commonwealth University. CTI provides information, resources, demonstration and research on pathways to employment that support youth with disabilities to gain access to integrated competitive employment to the fullest extent possible. https://centerontransition.org/index.html

Keywords:

Disclosure: A personal decision and process in which an individual with a disability determines what information they would like to share about their disability for the specific purpose of receiving accommodations.  By law, this is a personal decision.  The individual can seek assistance from supports and family members to determine what, when, how and to whom they share information about their disability.

Reasonable Accommodation:  As defined by ODEP, a reasonable accommodation is “a modification or adjustment to a job, the work environment, or the way things are usually done during the hiring process. These modifications enable an individual with a disability to have an equal opportunity not only to get a job, but successfully perform their job tasks to the same extent as people without disabilities. The ADA requires reasonable accommodations as they relate to three aspects of employment: 1) ensuring equal opportunity in the application process; 2) enabling a qualified individual with a disability to perform the essential functions of a job; and 3) making it possible for an employee with a disability to enjoy equal benefits and privileges of employment.

Employment Specialist: Also called a job coach, an employment specialist supports an individual with a disability in the employment hiring and training process.  Employment specialists often act as liaison between a business and employee to ensure that accommodations and supports are in place so that an employee with a disability can be successful in the workplace.

Disability Employee Network or Resource Group: Voluntary, employee-led groups that foster a diverse and inclusive workplace.  The focus of a disability group may be how employees with disabilities can support one another, but they can also influence business practices, recruitment, and retention.